Autism is my superpower

күнү жарыяланды 2021-ж., 9-апр.
Көрүүлөр 881 234
94

Learn more about AANE here: www.aane.org/
Join [THE FACILITY] right now for members-only live streams, behind-the-scenes posts, and office hours with me: www.patreon.com/kylehill
Twitter: Sci_Phile
Instagram: sci_Phile
Artist: Masood Safdarian
Editor: Lilit Aramyan
ARIA: @ClaireMax
Smart boi: Kyle
Music: bensound.com
Sound effects: freesound.org

Kyle Hill
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  • Kyle Hill

    Kyle Hill

    Ай мурун

    *Thank you for all the messages, comments, and stories you’re sharing with me today. But my story isn’t really for me — I only hope that my experience can illuminate and educate.*

    • Birdie and the Bear

      Birdie and the Bear

      2 саат мурун

      Working on your terminology would be beneficial as well.

    • Dh.Bryson

      Dh.Bryson

      18 саат мурун

      I used to sit alone in highschool and write raps in my car, my parents forced me to play sports so I knew a lot of kids, but I always felt like I never was able to fit in. I’ve become extremely detached from family and the one friend I did have in highschool, and I’ve been thinking I need to look into this more. I taught myself code and got a software job, and have always seen the world numerically. I am married and my wife has been saying I should really go get it looked into, as she thinks my behavior is odd. I didn’t have the courage to actually go and meet with someone to find out, but this helps me a lot, and I relate to the story. Thanks man I appreciate it.

    • Michaela Engelbrecht

      Michaela Engelbrecht

      Күн мурун

      As someone who also received a late autism diagnosis I found your story very inspiring. I was diagnosed at the age of 21 back in 2019 after I too decided to research and find out why my mind worked the way it did. I had been misdiagnosed by a number of doctors as a child with everything from OCD to ADHD to simply being a difficult child. When I was finally diagnosed my doctor told me, "There's nothing wrong with you, you just work differently." My diagnosis also led to the diagnosis of my younger sister and even my father. Recently my 3 year old cousin was diagnosed with a more severe form of ASD but seeing that so many members of my family have gotten so far without even knowing they were on the spectrum and that people such as yourself have even been able to use it as an advantage, has been a huge encouragement to all of us.

    • Nyx Zorander

      Nyx Zorander

      3 күн мурун

      This is very brave! We love just the same. You are a shining example of humanity. If aliens ever come to earth I say “send this guy” XD anyone any less wholesome and pure just won’t do! But yeah seriously I say that jokingly but only in part. the sentiment is absolutely true! I get that this was hard for you but you nailed it and there is no shame to be had. I hope it gets easier for you! 🤘🤘🤘

    • TayloredArt 01

      TayloredArt 01

      3 күн мурун

      Thanks for opening this can of worms in my life. Seriously, tho, thanks

  • grovak

    grovak

    7 мүнөт мурун

    Great advice for anyone! Well spoken

  • Brodi

    Brodi

    40 мүнөт мурун

    Thank you so much for doing this, Kyle! My son was diagnosed with ASD, as was my brother. It wasn't until I learned about it through him that it occurred to me that I may be on the spectrum myself. I hadn't really taken any steps about it, but because of your bravery, I believe that I should too. Thank you again for the inspiration!

  • Mr.Ocote

    Mr.Ocote

    Саат мурун

    Legend

  • ElRaheem Spears

    ElRaheem Spears

    2 саат мурун

    I clicked on this video for its title.
    I have a nephew called C.J. He is now thirteen years old, and I've been including him in my graphic novels as C.J. Powers since his diagnosis with aspergers at age six.
    I've always reminded his mum(my younger sister) that he's not handicapped, he's super intelligent, perceptive and integral to change.
    BTW: I watch Because Science w/my kids every chance I get. Keep up the good works. I appreciate you.

  • Shay O'Dwyer

    Shay O'Dwyer

    2 саат мурун

    Kyle, I am also autistic. I was genuinely surprised that you were because you seem much more....confident than I ever feel. So finding out that you are, yes, does help.

  • Reznov119 gaming

    Reznov119 gaming

    2 саат мурун

    Hey I think you should watch the channel Max Darrat he also has ASD and he does a lot of videos about ASD

  • Nicholas Foster

    Nicholas Foster

    3 саат мурун

    This Helped Me Realized So Much About Myself, Why i Never Learn Traditionally Always Conceptionally..... Damn this Video Hit Hard..... Thank You So Much Kyle! really took a weight off My Psyche

  • Karin Allen

    Karin Allen

    3 саат мурун

    Kyle, if you're still following the comments here, I just want to chime in and say your "coming out" as an Aspie makes you a huge role model to others on the spectrum - including me. Also, I figured out the keys-on-top-of-my-food hack too. I recommend it to any Aspie who has trouble remembering their leftovers home. 😉

  • DorminLebra

    DorminLebra

    3 саат мурун

    I've been following Because Science for a long time and this changes nothing! Thank you for sharing your story! Keep on being a super hero!

  • Taylor Lee

    Taylor Lee

    5 саат мурун

    Every man with European blood has super powers.

  • Ben Thomason

    Ben Thomason

    5 саат мурун

    I get really annoyed when I see people claim that autism isn't a disability. Not just because of my own autism, but primarily because I'm a science nerd. I mean, whenever it happens, I ask "do you tell that to your psychiatrist?"

  • Useless Man

    Useless Man

    6 саат мурун

    while kyle was describing his life, i totally saw myself in it. aside from working, i'm a lazy piece of excrement

  • TheCaffeineKid

    TheCaffeineKid

    6 саат мурун

    Thank you Kyle. I wish I felt as empowered as you seem to be. I am 50 and was only diagnosed a couple of years ago, after spending a lifetime thinking I was somehow broken and wrong. It's taking a long time to come to terms with the fact that perhaps I'm not as complete a failure of a human being as I've always thought.

  • MasterJayShay

    MasterJayShay

    7 саат мурун

    I as well have aspergers and my parents learned very early on that I wasn't usual. At the age of 2 my parents bought me a puzzle roughly the size of the living room and they noticed I knew where the pieces went without ever looking at the image on the other side of overturned pieces.
    I struggle with social situations and dislike a lot of high energy situations. I have a major problem with the concept of being evaluated, and it used to be public speaking in general, but I'm a college instructor so I had to overcome that fast.
    I also have this weird thing in my head where it's surprisingly empty. Which means that I dont actively think. A lot of answers just come to me when I'm left alone and that also makes me super observant because I can hear noises in my apartment happening two or three floors down since I'm not very busy in my own head. It can be overwhelming when I'm not focusing but I can fix that by focusing on a specific sound or by wearing headphones.
    I had a student come in to office hours once and they said that they were concerned because their two year old was diagnosed with autism and they weren't sure how to handle it. They were super relieved to learn that I was also on the spectrum and that I had done as well as I had. They were just concerned that their child wouldn't get to live a fulfilling life with that condition.

  • AKprime051

    AKprime051

    8 саат мурун

    One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, it’s just as true to say one man’s superpower is another man’s living nightmare. I am both blind and have ADHD, if some doctor came to me tomorrow with a cure for both I wouldn’t hesitate. And it’s not me being ashamed of either one, just wanting to have the same quality of life everyone else does without all the extra hard work.

  • Michelle & Dale Cannon

    Michelle & Dale Cannon

    8 саат мурун

    Nothing but love from us! We know it was hard for you to do, but we all hope you feel unburdened afterward. Keep up your own personal weird, cause we love it :)

  • DOUBLEH

    DOUBLEH

    8 саат мурун

    know what? It really IS your superpower! Your trademark that makes you who you are!

  • Lorruc

    Lorruc

    9 саат мурун

    I also have this, I know how it feels. I preferred books and nature and solitude compared to socialization when I was younger and still do honestly today. The super nerdy thing is if it wasn't for DnD I probably would've continued to be reclusive and not make friends. I'm glad I have it, bc it helped me become who I am. I support you immensely and will always love your content! Keep strong and well!

  • Latisha Thompson

    Latisha Thompson

    9 саат мурун

    Thank you for this video. I know it took a lot for you to sit down and make yourself vulnerable to others. My son is 20 y/o. He was diagnosed with autism when he was in kindergarten. Throughout his elementary and high school years he received all the services the school system has to offer. He graduated from high school BARELY, but he did it! Just last year he was kicked off of disability benefits back in November because they said he no longer was affectedby his disability. Now, he is not eligible for a lot of the benefits. Those services helped him to learn to communicate and meet people with his same issues. Hopefully,, the organization that you spoke about can lead me in the right direction. He is an anime fan and loves to draw. DBZ is his fave...lol. He has a YouTube channel Cedric Thompson Resote107. Check it out if you get a chance. He does his rants about his family and some DBZ Abridged reactions. Sorry for the long comment. Thank you again for your transparency.

  • XBrossive Aggro

    XBrossive Aggro

    11 саат мурун

    Congrats. I imagine stuff like this isn’t easy to talk about.
    Real talk tho, I thought you were just some average dude who was REALLY into Science, and found it really interesting.
    Still gonna watch.

  • The Red Turtle

    The Red Turtle

    15 саат мурун

    My brain is also wired differently, not sure what it is though, but people that have Asperger's and autism, most of them even that other people notice, i cant tell if people have autism usually

  • Juha Pasanen

    Juha Pasanen

    17 саат мурун

    Thank You for sharing this with us! You make world a better place. I think we all have some autistic features. There is no "normal" persons.

  • Pat M

    Pat M

    18 саат мурун

    Thanks for putting this message out there Kyle. I think at this point in my life I needed to hear this more than ever. I can relate a lot to what you are saying and think its time to take the proper steps to address my situation.

  • Lucas Trombini Lopes

    Lucas Trombini Lopes

    21 саат мурун

    I knew something about different levels of autism, or like you present, spectrum, but honestly, only by watching your videos, I would never perceive that. Anyway, you have very interesting content, and I can only congratulate your work and wish peace and success for you. P.S.: Probably it has nothing to do with the subject, but: I cannot understand why I comprehend 100% of what you say, but when I try to watch Vanda Vision, The Mandalorian and Falcon and The Winter Soldier without legends, my rate is about 60-80 % (my native language is portuguese). Maybe because the actors are interpreting rushness? Maybe because the noise? I don't know.

  • Eddie Rivero

    Eddie Rivero

    22 саат мурун

    I always figured you marched to the beat of your own drum. I’m happy you were able to figure this out and live WITH it, not against it.

  • Grogu

    Grogu

    23 саат мурун

    i got no real routine i cant think of what to do that will be any good and then i keep thinking about death and what ever i do or don't do doesn't even matter, when i was active in past i didn't feel any happiness as opposed to being lost and doing nothing is idk anymore. i don't know what i am and i am bad at talking and eye contact. anything i do goes wrong persistently i cant think clearly or get out of my head its like im staring through everything with that cross eyed effect with no clear thoughts that is my existance

  • Captain Riz

    Captain Riz

    Күн мурун

    I have autism, and I am very confused about the repeated identifying with the label "Asperger's" when Asperger was a Naazi (misspelled in case that word is filtered), and all "Asperger's" is is the differentiation he made between children with Autism, the ones deemed "low functioning" were sent off to death camps and the "high functioning" ones were studied further. it's ALL Autism, which we know is a spectrum. I am giving the benefit of the doubt that maybe you do not know this, but the label "Asperger's syndrome" has been abandoned in favor of calling all of it Autism. with the history of eugenics behind it, "Asperger's" as a label should definitely be left in the past.
    And the terms "high functioning" and "low functioning" are terms from allistics who just want to classify us as how good we are at pretending to be allistic. if an autistic person feels the need to differentiate themselves as "high functioning" as a way of othering themselves from other autistic people who are less able to mask their autism, they might need to examine why that is.

  • Jeremy Cheely

    Jeremy Cheely

    Күн мурун

    Took me 35 years to figure out what was wrong with me. Depression and Autism. Therapy, meds and surround myself with loving people.

  • Soirtemeht

    Soirtemeht

    Күн мурун

    Eh, labels. I always knew I was different, so I just started acting like the others at a very young age. A lot of comedy, some not comedy, but now as an adult I'm comfortable being me. I'm weird, no doubt. But fuck it.

  • Matthew Tully

    Matthew Tully

    Күн мурун

    Elon Musk confirmed he had Asperger syndrome on SNL last night which was as of 2013 is considered out dated terminology for Autism Spectrum Disorder this video when I first watched it meant a lot to me because I personally have ASD which was originally diagnosed with Asperger syndrome because I was very intellectually gifted but socially inept so when I learned that two of my biggest idols have ASD and can live and work effectively brings me comfort thank you Kyle and thank you Elon for having the strength to come out about your condition to give it more awareness.

  • Joseph Hildebrand

    Joseph Hildebrand

    Күн мурун

    I found that the environment that worked best for me was being outside so I took up jobs in construction and landscaping. My family always saw me as lazy and unintelligent but afterwards they see me as the smartest and hardest working person in my generation

  • Emily Nelson

    Emily Nelson

    Күн мурун

    With me I was atypical to the point where I was diagnosed in elementary school after they tried to throw me into anger management classes simply because I was the focal point of all the major issues going on at school. I prefer the company of myself, and was more likely to go out collecting bugs, especially studying the behaviour of ants than I was to hang out with other kids. I also became an avid rock collector at a young age, but obsessed to the point where at the age of 8 I not only new of the different types of rocks(igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic) but the names of specific rocks. I excessively studied history, and was fascinated by numbers, dinosaurs, and space. I have high functioning aspergers syndrome. Something else that my parents introduced me to is music though through piano lessons. I actually love music so much that I'm pursuing it as a career, after I attempted to do computer science, but failed at all the padding classes.

  • Logan Williams

    Logan Williams

    Күн мурун

    Just shut up

  • Alfonso

    Alfonso

    Күн мурун

    Ok, this is the thing... nowdays everyone call Asperger "autism"... when it's not the same and I find it offensive to the people that actually has autism. Asperger is on the same spectrum, the so called "autistic spectrum"... but the impact on the life of the subject is not EVEN CLOSE to the true autism, that most of the time includes intellectual disability or other deeper problems.
    I am on the spectrum too, I am Asperger, with mild symptoms that have always been with me. Like you, I used to isolate (I still do it), like you, I need to make a big effort to remember the names of the people, like you I tend to keep in my own my mind with my meccano (much better than lego XD), and like you, I didn't fully understood it until I was on college... studying psychology.
    I don't consider it a superpower. It makes me stronger in some aspects and weaker in others, but in those that I consider the important ones, I am weaker. Treating with people, it has always felt so artificial for me, so forced, I need to learn how to act "natural".
    But no one is perfect. Everyone is stronger in some areas and weaker in others. I don't think that knowing I am Asperger actually helped me at all. I do what I have always done. Keep trying to improve. Aspergers are very functional and absolutely able to change themselves to adapt to any situation.
    But I don't like to call us autists. I have known and work with true autists and there's no comparison. They have it real hard, not us.

  • Solid x Angry Joer

    Solid x Angry Joer

    Күн мурун

    Welcome to the Club

  • John Anderson

    John Anderson

    Күн мурун

    Okay, then if I'm completely honest.. as an ethical vegan I cringe whenever you script a 'mm bacon type joke' into your videos. The only reason I'm still a subscriber is because I have not taken the time to explain how damaging your words can be and how poorly received they are by roughly 15% of your subscriber base and the fastest growing demographic on the planet.
    My greatest hope is that you come to realize that methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than Co2 is because of it's molecular shape and its refraction index. I hope that you come to realize that humanity murders more non-human animals in just 2.7 days than every single human life lost in every war, skirmish and/or battle in the entirety of recorded history combined. I hope that you realize that there are in excess of fifty BILLION non-human methane producing animals trapped in the animal agriculture industry worldwide at any given moment, and that each one of them are murdered before their 7 month on this hateful planet. I hope that you come to realize that the reason that the Amazon jungle is constantly being burned to the ground and cleared, is to convert that area into farmlands that stretch out as far as the eye can see in every direction. Those megafarms are growing soybeans and legumes, not for human consumption... but rather to feed to so called 'slaughter animals' in 1st world countries because there simply isn't enough arable land on Earth to support humanity's ever increasing demand for animal products.

  • MegaKiwi

    MegaKiwi

    Күн мурун

    Thank you

  • MegaKiwi

    MegaKiwi

    Күн мурун

    One thing that has helped me a lot with my Aspergers is to remember that it is a valuable part of my identity but it doesn’t control my identity. Make of that what you will

  • Kisame66

    Kisame66

    Күн мурун

    I'm going to show this video to my daughter. She loves to hear other people with Autism tell their stories. We also love your videos so for her to hear that your like her will bring a big smile to her face.

  • johnny elkins

    johnny elkins

    Күн мурун

    Kayle a major difference between me and you is the fact that i actually like to socialize with people and enjoy it to the point that i have fun annoying others so much that they don't want to talk to me again but they do anyways. Though some noise i grow to hate as i hear it over and over again like a cat wanting to mate as a example, and man i tell ya neighborhood cats are annoying.

  • Read 譯Jordan 文達

    Read 譯Jordan 文達

    Күн мурун

    wow. a lot of this is helpful for me. hmm.

  • I like Music

    I like Music

    Күн мурун

    Hell yeah man!

  • lee jia xin李家鑫

    lee jia xin李家鑫

    Күн мурун

    i am weird in almost all ways but i am NOT an autism and i want to somehow(i know it is weird)

  • Otomon

    Otomon

    Күн мурун

    Okay there Kanye

  • Gedarva

    Gedarva

    Күн мурун

    I have ADHD, my son has it, my daughter might, and my stepson is autistic. I appreciate the bravery it takes to open up like this. Especially knowing how much it means to your audience. Thank you.

  • Gork Skoal

    Gork Skoal

    Күн мурун

    Deep Breaths. And how about something: Fuck yes man! on the Aspergers Spectrum!

  • Philip Gibson

    Philip Gibson

    Күн мурун

    Thank you for doing this. I watch your videos for myself and with my son. He has ADHD and ASD and we get really involved and vocal when chatting about the topics from your videos. Can't wait to share this news with him. He enjoys hearing about famous people who have regular lives with ASD and ADHD. He says it gives him hope for a regular life too.

  • Chiedza Dziruni

    Chiedza Dziruni

    2 күн мурун

    I'm really happy we got to see your chair at the end. I was thinking about it the whole video. Like damn, he owns a chair, I didn't see that coming.

  • robin hood

    robin hood

    2 күн мурун

    You literally just described my own childhood, and that even today I am 40 now but I still live in isolation, I spend all my time on my own playing complex pc games and super focussing on one particular aspect or game. I read a lot, always the same kind of sci-fi novella. And I write D&D storyline to the point of obsession. I too am very science focussed and help moderate a reddit sub mostly based on data driven peer reviewed climate change science.
    It never occurred to me I could have Autism even though looking introspectively and comparing how I behave to other people its always seemed to me that I never quite "fit in" with them. Everyone I know acts in a manner that I always find odd but just let it go and get on with my life, but it's like an itch that I can't scratch, it's always been there.
    Maybe everyone isn't the odd one, maybe it's me.

  • Chiedza Dziruni

    Chiedza Dziruni

    2 күн мурун

    That explains it

  • Andrew Belton

    Andrew Belton

    2 күн мурун

    Thank you for this video.
    I was diagnosed with ASD a long time ago and have honestly struggled with it. I've always tried to just treat it as "something I have" without adapting my life to help my quality of life, but this has really got me to sit down and think about what I should do to work with it.
    Edit: The sound thing? YES. Gods, there are so many sounds that drive me insane.

  • melimsah

    melimsah

    2 күн мурун

    This is such an amazing video to hear. I lived with anxiety and depression my whole life, or so I thought it was just those. Whatever is atypical about my brain served me very well in school (for the most part), but once I got into the professional world, I really really started to struggle. And as a woman, I find it hard to get any doctors or therapists to listen to me or take me seriously when I try sharing my experiences and trying to figure out WHY I am the way I am. (I literally had a psychologist say essentially "oh putting any labels on your behaviors is pointless at your age"). I'm on ADHD meds now, but I don't know 100% if it IS ADHD - maybe it's Asperger's, maybe it's a form of OCD, I have no idea and I wish I did. I had no idea that it's not normal to interrupt people during a passionate conversation - my whole family does it. I hate that I am so anxiety ridden about social interaction because I always worry about "socializing wrong." I wish I knew how to be certain about what my brain is doing, so I can start really working towards fitting my brain into a world that wont change for me. It's such a frustrating struggle right now.

  • I'm Just Kyle

    I'm Just Kyle

    2 күн мурун

    *Everyone loved that*

  • Tobias John

    Tobias John

    2 күн мурун

    Self acceptance/realization is an amazing thing. Go forth! Embrace all that is you. And this message goes for anyone.

  • John Belcher

    John Belcher

    2 күн мурун

    Yeah found out I was on the spectrum in 2012 and didn't get diagnose till 2016
    It's true people don't realize how you really can't tell if someone is autistic, but that is also the hard part about finding autism in adults. As a child you learn to act and develop in ways to communicate with people it's hard but by the time you're an adult that grew up with some friends you act more or less like them.
    I mean there's more to it than that but i don't have time to write a book for a comment about this lol

  • Azazel Ashbight

    Azazel Ashbight

    2 күн мурун

    Saw the title and immediately went "Same"

  • Seth Kimmel

    Seth Kimmel

    2 күн мурун

    You are awesome 👏

  • James Evanko

    James Evanko

    2 күн мурун

    Anyone else ever get called out for capitalizing words and using punctuation in a text message?

  • James Evanko

    James Evanko

    2 күн мурун

    I live alone in a raised ranch. So, the front door to my house has steps that go up to the main living level and steps that go down to the basement and garage. If I have something important I need to take with me when going somewhere, I usually leave it right in front of the steps on the main floor. Pretty hard to forget it. Curious how well this works if you live with others.

  • Akbar Gulam

    Akbar Gulam

    2 күн мурун

    I also don't make eye contact with anyone and I've always self isolated even before Covid19 came about and I like anything shiny

  • Lennit Max

    Lennit Max

    2 күн мурун

    Hey. So watching this video made me curious about my own neurological connection as I have felt I am "not normal" according to societal standards. I struggle to understand what different personalities are and how brain chemistry actually works. More so cause I find it difficult to understand why Autism is such an issue, not because I don't see it as a viable medical condition, but because I don't understand it in general as that's what I know as normal.
    I have thought myself things, such as eye contact, to hug people and some other random social aspects, but on the most part I start shaking when meeting new people, when having eye contact during a conversation I look eye contact and even when trying to find a spot on a person's face I don't know where to look and just try to cope with the convo as I go along.
    I haven't really spoken about this to anyone, so I'm not sure if I have Autism or not, or if it's just really bad Anxiety. Hopefully 1 day, when I get enough money, I can get professional help and actually find out what my issue is.
    Also I would like to apologise if I may offended anyone with this message. I dont know if I do understand everything properly and gave my example of my issues properly.
    But thanks for making this video. Means a lot to get some type of understanding about what Autism really is.

    • Jade

      Jade

      19 саат мурун

      Hey dude! Autism can be a bit difficult to diagnosis as an adult. But if you feel that you might have, talking to clinical psychologist (not talk therapists) might be your best bet in figuring out if you have it. If you have insurance maybe you could find one in your network. Trouble with eye contact is a HUGE indicator of Autism, as well as ADHD and other forms of neurodivergency (like OCD, BPD, etc). And Autism can make people super anxious because they don’t know what to do in social situations. Anxiety and Autism is definitely comorbid. So the anxiety could be caused by said Autism and vice versa. And don’t worry abt being shamed for self diagnosing, it’s actually encouraging among the autistic community (of course with proper research) since it’s so difficult to get diagnosed after you turn 18. And it’s definitely a privilege not a lot of people can afford. ASAN is a good autism network to get in touch with people and learn more! If you want, maybe joining discord or social media groups centered around adhd/autism support might help you. Since you’ll be around other autistic people and they might help you with any questions you might have! Hope u get the help you need

  • Bannjerplays

    Bannjerplays

    2 күн мурун

    I know this will be a controversial opinion. But autism isnt a superpower. They are no less or no more than a person without autism. They just cant do certain things as well as normally functioning people. And can some things better. I do think that autistic people are very strong for working past their weaknesses. But that isnt a autism respective thing. Being determined isnt a superpower. Its a strength. But not all autistic people are high functioning and not all autistic people work past their deficits in their brain. It is a choice to be strong and work past your issues

  • Leweise

    Leweise

    2 күн мурун

    OMG ONE OF THESE DAMN VIDEOS LMMFAO

  • jonny1989z

    jonny1989z

    3 күн мурун

    We realised our recently turned 4 son was on the spectrum when we got him referred and found out he had a IQ of 156 and could have been the ceiling of 160 if he hadn't of got bored before the end of the examination. He can tell you 1000 facts about exo planets and all their moons and types of galaxies and nebulae. He can also say and write the alphabet in Russian, Greek, French, Spanish, Arabic, cherokee... his brain has the capacity and capability of child twice his age if not more.............. but on the flip side. He puts his shoes on the wrong foot. Gets his/her mixed up. Can't do physical daily mundane tasks most other kids find easy. He hates loud noises and sometimes has to wear head phones etc.... but there's times his behaviour is "average" and other people are like "really?!?!" When we say his on the spectrum. Because when you mention the A word it carries a stigma.. breaking down that stigma is the best thing we can do.

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      Sounds like a pretty cool kid, I'd love to talk exoplanets with him some time. Ask him about 55 Cancri E! And if he doesn't know that one, he should totally look it up. Cool as heck!

    • jonny1989z

      jonny1989z

      3 күн мурун

      Oh n FYI he would have been the youngest mensa member in the UK but he got knocked back the first time he applied because his news would of overshadowed a recent young member who was on the news as the youngest a month before... but turns out mensa is over rated anyway... POTENTIAL PLUS do sooooooooooooooo much more for gifted children in the UK.

  • Robocop2015

    Robocop2015

    3 күн мурун

    Dude, this is introversion/shyness at worse, not autism nor Asperger. Your doctors are idiots.

    • Jade

      Jade

      13 саат мурун

      @Robocop2015 yea ur right on that one, I thought psychs had mds cuz mine had one and a phd 😭, memory suckss. Almost every psych I’ve had did have a phd, I’m pretty sure it’s standard but maybe my healthcare provider just had all the good ones lol. But psychologists can give diagnoses 100 percent on that, therapists rly can’t I don’t think, and definitely not school counselor therapists I know that. I feel like diagnoses given by therapists should be more criticized cuz it does happen unfortunately lol, that or ppl will say “oh i have x disorder cuz my therapist said I might have it” like no lmao. Diagnoses can be weird as hell, and I’ve met autistic ppl who were diagnosed at like 4 who have the exact same behaviors as he does. Autism is a super complicated disorder and can manifest in so many different ways, it is called autism spectrum disorder after all. Point is, we don’t know someone’s medical history or day to day just by what we see online, that’s all I’m rly trying to say. Same who doesn’t love a god italian lord, rip to the celiac disease peeps tho

    • Robocop2015

      Robocop2015

      13 саат мурун

      @Jade Psychologists ARE NOT MD, they do not have medical qualification. They could have PhD (few of them) but a PhD is a scientific degree not a medical one. I would be very skeptical regarding a diagnosis made by a psychologist. I am not accusing our friend here is faking it, i am questioning his diagnosis. If he is told by someone trustworthy (and yeah, psychologists are smooth talkers) but without proper qualification that he is ill, is understandable he would belive that; totally not his fault. PS: i love bread. :D

    • Jade

      Jade

      14 саат мурун

      @Robocop2015 Clinical psychologists actually can diagnosis mental illness and neurodivergency! A behavioral psychologist and a psychiatrist diagnosed me at age six. Psychiatrists can only administer and prescribe medication. Think of it like, therapists are ppl you talk to, psychologists are those who help to diagnose the problem, while psychiatrists are ones who administer medication (and also diagnose). Psychologists ARE doctors, they all have MD’s and PHD’s, they go to medical school just like psychiatrists, they only can’t administer meds. So they are medical professionals. If they weren’t, you wouldn’t be able to get a psychological evaluation from them (for context you can only get recommended a psych eval by a medical profession). I definitely agree that Autism or any form of neurodivergency should be taken very seriously, and the diagnostic criteria for adults is lacking but theres definitely doctors who work with what they have to help with autistic adults. This isn’t just a problem with autism though, this is a problem with neurodivergency in general for adults. Because so much of the material is geared towards children, even when you try and find info of how to actually LIVE with said disorders, the only info online is for kids. Autism and ADHD is not a childrens disorder, ugh I’m so mad abt that. I definitely feel that the wrong diagnosis could impact ppls lives, but we have to look at neurodivergency and autism as a spectrum, with an almost endless combination of symptoms. Autism can be mild for some and downright debilitating to others. For me my ADHD is severe, but I have a friend with adhd who’s much more mild than mine. Same with Autism, I don’t rly think its fair to say who is and isn’t actually autistic because we only see a portion of someone online, we only see a fraction of who they are. And we have NO idea what there day to day life is, so how can I say if someone is faking a disorder? Unless it’s EXTREMELY obvious that its fake but they’re still mentally ill for taking a neurological developmental disorder. I just hope that in the future diagnostic material can improve and adults with these disorders can be diagnosed sooner and more effectively. Also why tf does everyone have a gluten intolerance? What’s wrong with bread??? Bread is good for your soul!!!

    • Robocop2015

      Robocop2015

      14 саат мурун

      @Jade Jade i understand your point and I agree these are difficult to diagnose later in life. Clinical Psychologists are usually not allowed to diagnose psychiatric conditions as far as i know; they are just not medically qualified to diagnose an otherwise significant psychiatric condition. Let alone that the diagnosis in an adult eludes even psychiatrists due to lack of criteria. Only psychiatrists (or pediatric neurologists/psychiatrists) should diagnose conditions like autism or Asperger's. These are not to be taken lightly as gluten intolerance but diseases that have a huge impact on patients lives; they should be taken seriously and dealt with by a medically trained individual. Autism and Aspergers should NOT be the new "gluten intolerance" that all the stars seem to suffer from. Please don't treat these diseases as celebrity's ailments thank you very much.

    • Jade

      Jade

      19 саат мурун

      @Robocop2015 It is quite difficult to diagnose autism/aspergers in adults due to the diagnostic material focusing mostly on children. But if said autism/aspergers is causing enough distress it can be diagnosed by clinical psychologists in adulthood, its just a bit difficult (and quite expensive for the patients). Just because someone didn’t get diagnosed as a child doesn’t mean they never had it. Same thing with ADHD, I was lucky to be diagnosed as a child (age 6), but for adults it can be difficult but can be done. There’s tons of misinformation on autism/aspergers so pls don’t take this as me being mean, just educating from what I learned from professionals.

  • W4V3-_-ASSASSIN

    W4V3-_-ASSASSIN

    3 күн мурун

    lol

  • Jack cuz

    Jack cuz

    3 күн мурун

    Beautiful

  • Brandon Halsey

    Brandon Halsey

    3 күн мурун

    i was diagnosed with Asperger's when i was 5 years old :) its a very interesting form of autism :D don't see it as a hindrance! nor a syndrome or a disorder! be happy brother :D

  • Angela Mimimce

    Angela Mimimce

    3 күн мурун

    EWWW THIS GUY IS 1 OF THOSE, WHITE PRIVLEDGE GUYS...HATES HE IS WHITE...
    SAD

    • Angela Mimimce

      Angela Mimimce

      2 күн мурун

      google awwww get a job first

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      Ew, one of *those* commenters. Get out of here.

  • deadblindeyes

    deadblindeyes

    3 күн мурун

    bravoooo

  • fotnite

    fotnite

    3 күн мурун

    I'm working on getting diagnosed, and have been doing a lot of introspection over the last year. It's pretty convenient that many of the people I watch seem to be doing this introspection around the same time I am.

    It started when a creator I watch was diagnosed with depression, and said that meds helped him and that the apathy they gave him really helped. I commented about how my experience with apathy was very different, how everything almost seems "neutral" because I have such a hard time knowing what I'm feeling, which got responses from people that sounded very confused. I did some digging and found that this wasn't apathy, this was a condition called "alexithymia". More digging revealed that information on alexithymia was very incomplete because up until recently, psychologists had a very hard time separating the symptoms of alexithymia and the symptoms of autism, and that an estimated range of about 45%-65% (if I remember correctly) of autists also have co-occurring alexithymia.

    I thought it was unfortunate that there wasn't much info, and moved on.

    Then, in my AP Psychology class, we were studying mental disorders, and had a day for autism. We watched a speech from an autistic girl talking about her communication issues, where she explained that she feels like she always has to "translate" her thoughts into human language, because she always thinks in terms of pictures. I thought this was interesting, because I think primarily in abstract concepts and sounds, and so I have the same issue, which is part of what causes me to stutter so often. While I was aware of my stutter at the time, I didn't realize it was as bad or as common as it is until I asked my girlfriend about it recently. So, this hint went over my head too.

    In the same psychology class, a classmate was asking about how I am able to remember so many of the lectures we had, or made many of the links between the class and others that I mentioned to him sometimes. I talked about my memorization strategy, which I referred to at the time is to have a "line of thought", where I start at the concept that is talked about during class, and that concept reminds me of something else from a different class, which reminds me of another concept and so on, until I reach something we studied much earlier in the year and make the connection, kind of like a wikirace in my head. This makes complete sense to me, it's basically how I've always thought of the world (though it does contribute to some problems with focusing), but this seemed to only confuse him even more.

    Next, I was sitting in a major class at university earlier this year, where I had been assigned to work with a partner who I actually knew from highschool during my freshman year. He remarked on how I didn’t “act like a little kid” anymore (he was a junior when I knew him), and mentioned he almost didn’t recognize me because of how different I act now. During the class, though, I found that I couldn’t stop fidgeting in my chair. While I’ve always had this issue (I often bob back and forth in chairs, pace, and do other repetitive actions), this moment was probably when I was the most conscious of it. Perhaps this was because I wanted to seem “cool” for him? I don’t know. But I found it very annoying that every time I stopped fidgeting, I’d go back to focus on the class, and then find that I was doing it again a couple minutes later.

    It was at this point that it occurred to me that something wasn’t right. Finally, I got a lead on this, though, when the next week, a coworker of mine who was diagnosed with aspergers as a child asked me if I was autistic. I wasn’t offended by this, mind you, but I was confused. I asked him why he would think that, and he told me that he noticed I was often silent around coworkers, had issues articulating, and that when I talked with him he could tell I had “special interests” (a term within the autistic community I wasn’t familiar with at the time). I was about to respond with a “so what” argument, thinking that he would need much more than that to know for sure, since autism was a complicated disorder. I knew a lot of the specifics on it, since I studied it in highschool (I even made a poster on it for my psychology class). But then, I realized that he might be onto something, and told him I’m not diagnosed, but I don’t actually know.

    When I got home, I found an online test called the Autism Quotient test, and an associated plot of test results for diagnosed autists and control subjects that the researchers designing the test had found. I found that the test gave me a very, very high score, one that was not only on the tail end of the curve for control subjects, but was decently higher than average for even autistic subjects. I searched up a youtube video by an autistic youtube channel talking about the test, and the results that the youtuber got, as well as some of her autistic viewers, still tended to be lower than mine.

    Since then, I’ve done a lot of research on the disorder, and have found that nearly all of the abnormal occurrences that I could identify in my childhood (though these were sparse, my memory is pretty selective so I don’t remember much past 2 or 3 years ago) could be explained by the major symptoms of the disorder. Everything from my eating habits from childhood to today, to my specific issues with socializing, to my struggling in some highschool classes while breezing through much more difficult ones, my constant fidgeting, even down to my periodic headaches and migraines, could all be explained by this. It even serves as the source of trauma for my alexithymia (as alexithymia seems to be primarily caused by childhood emotional trauma).

    While I’m still in the diagnosis process, the preemptive evaluation that I got seems to indicate a high likelihood of autism. When I told my dad about all this, he shrugged off the statistics, studies, personal accounts of autists I related with, etc. and told me I “didn’t have autism” and that “it’s a spectrum, basically everyone’s on it” (not true, by the way). I can post-hoc argue against him, but my articulation issues makes that very difficult in the moment, because I can’t debate as fast as others can. Despite that, though, he seems to have recently come to accept my condition, and recently alluded to him believing I have autism as well. I had issues in telling my girlfriend to, as it seems she had some bad experiences with autists in the past, notably when her friend was emotionally abused by an autistic boyfriend, so she had some ableist preconceptions and feelings about autists. She seems to have mostly come to accept my condition too, though.

    I still struggle with knowing whether to tell employers, coworkers, acquaintances, etc. once I get my diagnosis. I know I can get university accommodations, especially for the standard testing environments that I have issues with, but even with the people very close to me I’ve told they have a hard time getting over their preconceptions, and in the meanwhile treat me almost like a pet, almost like I’m not exactly human. Even though the accommodations would really help, both from employers and my university, I’m scared that people will never treat me the same if they know the truth. It’s much easier to change the mind of someone close to you, but what about those where all they know about you is that you’re good at statistical analysis and have autism?

    I was recently talking with one of my supervisors at work, and she told me and everyone else about how I “acted like a child” for the first 3-4 weeks at the place. Looking back on how my coworkers talked to me then, I can see that they viewed me that way for a good while, not just her. It was with this that I realized that I have always been treated differently by society, that I’ve always been discriminated against in such a manner. But I still worry if that discrimination will be worse if I tell people the truth, or if I don’t repress the autistic parts of my personality as much as I do. I worry that people at work will treat me the same way society at large treats autist, like some kind of token to be passed around, like autism is the only part of them that matters. This treatment makes me both very angry and makes me want to cry when I see it, because I know that I would have been treated the same way, because I see myself on my screen being treated that way.

    I don’t know if I’ll be tokenized or face other social repercussions if I tell people, but I also know that I won’t get the help that I honestly need if I don’t tell people. This is the kind of thing that keeps me awake at night, because I know I’ll have to make that decision eventually, and that it could be the life or death of me either way.

    This is why it’s so comforting to see others come out with their own stories like you have, Kyle. It gives me hope that one day, I can come out with my own story without having to hide behind a username.

    Thank you for giving me hope.

  • r d a

    r d a

    3 күн мурун

    You are too awesome !

  • bastian rhone

    bastian rhone

    3 күн мурун

    Ya know I'm kinda at a similar point in my life where I think I was never diagnosed when I was younger either

  • Frosty_23

    Frosty_23

    3 күн мурун

    I always notice these random things in these kind of videos, but your eyes are beautiful.

  • Beth B

    Beth B

    3 күн мурун

    It is such a wild experience to find out that your internal experience of the world is not like everyone else's. It's not the same diagnosis, but I remember when I was 17, it was so strange to find out that not everyone on earth dealt with intense, mindbending, horrifying anxiety every second of every day... I thought I just wasn't pretending well enough.

    • Jade

      Jade

      19 саат мурун

      @Beth B Ugh, I hate big bang, It rly sucks how the only portrayal of autistic ppl is creepy nerdy white guys with no boundaries. And ultimately hurts everyone, including men who feel like they’re monsters just for a disorder they can’t control, and invalidating to women by having autism is media only show up in men. Adhd rep is even WORSE/nonexistent

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      @Beth B I *hate* that show, but I've listened to the actor behind the character and he's actually very respectful and such. The rampant sexism was the biggest turn off for me, but the portrayals of those on the spectrum was really uncool too.

    • Beth B

      Beth B

      3 күн мурун

      The "representation" in Big Bang Theory is so shitty because the show writer did not intend to write an autistic/ASD character, they just wrote someone they thought was "weird" and made him the obnoxious butt of every joke, and had accidentally written someone who fit into that diagnosis. It's really painful to see that kind of prejudice projected into a popular sitcom that reaches millions of people. Just like... why does the show have to be centered around how "annoying" he is? The later seasons amended their approach to the character and had the other characters relate to him more and show more affection, but that doesn't change the fact that the show spent years with his "peculiarities" being the one of the de facto nemeses of the show (along with women who don't want to fuck you, which is entitled as hell and gross and a separate discussion).

  • Scott Z

    Scott Z

    4 күн мурун

    This is awesome! Thank you for modeling vulnerability and living life with authenticity. I will share this with the children I work with that also are on the spectrum.

  • Hobo Baggins

    Hobo Baggins

    4 күн мурун

    Thank you

  • jaedaens

    jaedaens

    4 күн мурун

    It takes a lot of courage to openly discuss this, as there's still certainly a pronounced stigma pertaining to this subject. I'm not sure if I'm a high functioning autist, but it's quite likely that I am. In my childhood, I had pronounced echolalia and palilalia. Socialization had always been difficult for me, and it never came naturally. However, when it comes to my current 'obsessions', I am quite a fount of knowledge. It's led me to a quite respected and well paying career over the years. If it's something that I don't have a passion for though, it's very difficult to motivate myself to do much of anything. Decades later, I have no problems talking to anyone; it just took way more practice than most people require. People are shocked to hear of social anxiety in my youth. I'm not sure I would have practiced as hard as I did if I self applied the 'autistic' label earlier in life though. This is not to say it doesn't help some (most?), but I am truly glad I was never officially diagnosed. Your mileage may vary. Keep practicing talking to people. It's the absolute MOST important skill to become proficient at, IMHO.

  • Cree Moon

    Cree Moon

    4 күн мурун

    we always knew and loved you for it.

  • Dendé Hehr

    Dendé Hehr

    4 күн мурун

    I do not like people calling autism a "disorder". It feels like people want to make us feel less than we are. Autism is more like a different version of thinking, rather than a disorder in my opinion.

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      18 саат мурун

      @Jade I've been working with vocational rehab lately and they keep wanting to "zoom call" with me. I don't understand why, can they seriously not hear me if they don't see my eyes? How are we the disabled ones again? For fucks sake. We have to put up with so much shit, but they act like they're the fucking victims.

    • Jade

      Jade

      19 саат мурун

      @fuck google oh my god that last sentence relates so hard. Why do neurotypicals think I can’t hear them if I turn my head a little or look away? My ears work just fine lol.

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      I don't like that it's called "autism" either. It comes from the latin base "auto" or self, meaning it literally is called "selfism". Apparently the scientists demanded the autistic children pay attention to them, and since they didn't immediately bend to their whim, they were considered "selfish". Personally, I think it's neurotypical people that are handicapped. Unlike them, I can still understand what a person's saying with my eyes closed. (Yes, I'm being sarcastic in that last statement.)

  • RNG_MRCOOKED

    RNG_MRCOOKED

    4 күн мурун

    Its insane that you can explain complex things to us in an understandable way. even if you are in the autistic spectrum.

  • Lorentari

    Lorentari

    4 күн мурун

    12:10 You really got me thinking "Will we actually go back to shaking hand?"

  • Lorentari

    Lorentari

    4 күн мурун

    I can say, I don't think any different about you... I mean... You haven't changed as far as I'm concerned.
    Keep up making your great and fun content!

  • David Fields

    David Fields

    4 күн мурун

    I myself found out I have asperger's but my parents didnt know and had no idea how to handle it. And my daughter is the same way. But know what I do now I can teach her how to adjust and be herself with society. The power of experience to teach the new generation. She loves science and nature.

  • Kasper Buyens

    Kasper Buyens

    4 күн мурун

    Yes! finally someone that realises what i have been saying for years now?

  • TheSecretVault

    TheSecretVault

    4 күн мурун

    Sorry I am against this concept that Autism is a super power or as some call it the next stage in evolution. LOL. It is a disability which impares abilities and judgements. It can be worked around but in having had quite a few autistic people around me and even in my private life and I must say I think these people found it harder to cope than most and judgement calls were very questionable. Its like saying I have 3 wheels on my car but its better now at 4x4. Yes some people with autism remember stuff with photographic abilities SOMETIMES but that is rare. The problem is being a photocopier and being able to remember and reproduce stuff doesnt mean you understand the stuff you are reproducing. Which is why some with autism can do well in exams but if you talk to them they dont understand why you cant swim across the pacific in a rubber ring... because you might die. Just saying.

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      Күн мурун

      @TheSecretVault Yeah, it's probably the easiest and best analogy I've found for explaining it to people.

    • TheSecretVault

      TheSecretVault

      Күн мурун

      @fuck google i like the sliders all over the place description... lol.

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      It depends on the person. I've described it like um...Imagine each person has a set of sliders (like a stereo equalizer), each of which being a different aspects of their life, such as executive function (ability to plan ahead), sensitivity to sights/sounds/touch/taste/smell/etc, comfort with eye contact, social skills, etc. Neurotypical people tend to have their sliders around the 'default', without at most MAYBE one of the sliders considerably higher or lower than the average range. Autistic people are those with multiple, if not all, of their sliders in extreme positions. I have fantastic semantic memory but my episodic memory is awful. I'm excellent at understanding systemic concepts, but have poor social skills. The photographic memory thing generally isn't real, and the closest real life condition to it isn't an aspect of autism. So sometimes it can be a superpower, sometimes it can be a disability, sometimes it can be a minor quirk. People come in all kinds, and autism is a bit more complex than your understanding of it.

  • Kin

    Kin

    4 күн мурун

    To bad that my story gets deleted as i wanted to tell ya about my experience of growing up with adhd/cdc, bipolar and EUPD/borderline

  • J.S. Connolly

    J.S. Connolly

    4 күн мурун

    P. S. My Oldest Grand Son and ALL of his friends are "Science" or "Math" Nerds or BOTH! And they are THE SWEETEST and NICEST kids!
    My Grand daughter calls her brother and his friends a "Gaggle of Geeks" when she sees them together. But BECAUSE I am Into Star Wars/Star Trek/Comic Books/Science/Pirates and that sort of stuff... they don't mind me being around them. And I don't mind when my Grand Kids want to invite their fiends along when we go do things like swimming in the summer or to the park or to the hobby/gaming shops because they AND their parents KNOW me and know they are safe with me!
    And I love filling up my Van with my Grand Kids and their friends and going off for a day's adventure! It's ALWAYS fun AND we always find SOMETHING New to be interested in!

  • J.S. Connolly

    J.S. Connolly

    4 күн мурун

    WOW! Kyle... THIS was SUPER POWERFUL! And for people LIKE ME I APPLAUD YOU and SALUTE YOU For doing this! I am "DIFFERENT" and I've ALWAYS known I am!
    I'm 56... I was LITERALLY "PETER PARKER" when I was a kid growing up! I didn't do SPORTS, I LOVED and STILL Love Science and Art and History and Music, Science Fiction, Movies, Comic Books, and Costuming! For my 7th. Birthday my parents and my oldest sister, MADE for me an AUTHENTIC "SPIDER-MAN" Costume WITH VERY Realistic workings INCLUDING the Mask's "Eyes" which was Silver "Two-Way Film" my dad got from his work. That was used for the eye parts of the mask and it worked PERFECTLY! I was SO "Accurate" to the comics... that I USED to wear it under my street cloths TO SCHOOL.. with my Boots and gloves in my book bag and my mask in my back pants pocket JUST in case I had to be "READY for ACTION"!
    YES i was and STILL AM THAT MUCH of a Geek! But I LOVE IT and I'm PROUD Of it! I was a STRAIGHT 'A' Science student all through school and Graduated from High School with the TOP "Science Award" in 1983. Unfortunately... Deaths in my family in the 80's cause me to NOT go to collage for science... or anything! :(
    But still, all my life I have been a History AND Science AND Music AND Costuming Buff for with an Very Extensive Library of books and works some dating back to the early 16th century.
    I am also a Musician of over 43 yrs. and I've even taught Drumming and Percussion on and off throughout my life.

    My oldest Grand son whom is 16 and is JUST Learning how to drive, LOVES your "Because Science" vidz and we watched EVERY EPISODE Together! All THREE of my Grand Kids LOVE YOU and what you do! So YOU ARE NOT ALONE! You ARE a REAL "HERO" to us both Young AND Old...er! LOL :D
    So PLEASE... I KNOW doing this video was difficult... but from ALL of the comments I've read below.... AND from ALL OF US "DIFFERENT" People...You did an AMAZING and VERY Courageous thing!
    And AGAIN I SALUTE YOU SIR! :D

    PLEASE Keep Making us LOVE SCIENCE AND Laugh while you do it! PLEASE!
    Oh yes and Watch out for those Light Sabers! They ARE Kind of HOT Eh? LOL :D
    Joe Connolly
    Jefferson Wisconsin

  • Kin

    Kin

    4 күн мурун

    Hi guys. So im here to tell you about my daily life, upbringing, experience and struggles  with living with the diagnoses/disorders I have and believe me it's never been easy, there have always been some kind of struggle.  From school, daily life to relationships. I have always been very open about my diagnoses/disorders so its easy for me to talk about it and I will tell you all about it, hopefully you will take the time to read it all. If not then scroll down to the last ans and most important part of it all.
    First of is that I'm 33 years old and did get my first diagnos at the age of 6-7 with at that time was called DAMP( deficits in attention, motor control, and perception, DAMP is defined by the presence of five properties: Problems of attention, gross and fine motor skills, perceptual deficits, and speech-language impairments)
    here in Sweden, but has now been changed to ADHD/DCD. So school have always sucked for me, especially early as most of the teachers had little to no knowledge how to handle me and my problems, so there was a lot of meeting between my mother, doctors and the teachers. Where both my mom and my doctors and specialists had to explain and teach them about ADHD and  DCD and what kind of help I needed, there were a few special needs classes and teachers but it was still hard to get the right help in class, from getting the right kind of material that explained it in a way that I could understand or how the teacher or assistant explained it to during classes. I would say that the DCD was worse then the ADHD during primary school, any major sound or talking messed up my focus. While high school got better, the teachers had more understanding and more education on the type of problems of more students that had similar problems I had.
    Well let's leave the light talk and get into the heavy stuff shall we.
    As I said, I'm 33 years old and have been taking medication for pretty as long as i can remember. I think I was 6-7 when I started getting medication. As a kid I couldn't differential between reality and what was in my mind, I had psychosis and was paranoid. I was very often had delusional about things, it could be anything from animals, criminals, monsters or even the end of the world. More then once my mom found me sitting on table or high places with some kind of " weapon" be it a knife, chain or anything I could get my hands on to protect myself  cuz I was sure that a big snake or crocodile and similar was going to round the corner to attack me while she was out in the laundry room. Or that trolls, goblins and other monsters or even dinosaurs would come from outside charging in. All I knew was that I needed to be ready to defend myself from whatever that was coming for my life. Or that my mom and sister could have been killed the few minutes that they been gone. I could wake in the middle of the night in panic and fear and be "battle ready" needing to fight for both my and my mom and  sister's life, and my mom would need to wake up and calm me down. When my sister moved out and I got my own room I slept with more or less a bludgeon beside me to feel somewhat safe just in case I would be attacked from something or anything. I had my bludgeon, I had escape plans for when I needed to fight my way out. Having a sleepover at a friend's place was fun but at the same time a living hell. I didn't have a weapon, I didn't have 2-3 escape plans.  So so many time I couldn't  fall asleep or get the rest I needed cuz it was a new place and I didn't have any safety plans. This was pretty much my childhood from age 4 or 5 to 14. So at around the age of 6 I started with medication to battle psychosis and for sleeping. My teenage years wasn't much better, not as many periods of psychosis but when I was 14 I hit my first major depression. I pretty much went from moment of psychosis to depression. I still had anxiety, but I also started to have more destructive thoughts. I had extreme mood swings and at that time we didn't know why. In the beginning my mom had to more or less force to start to talk with psychiatrists and getting new and stronger antidepressants after a lot of compromises and many talks.  At 15 we started doing tests and investigation I was diagnosed with bipolar and a form of borderline called EUPD or emotionally unstable personality disorder.
    I guess EUPD could be called both my "super power" and my "weakness".  EUPD is a mental illness characterized by a long-term pattern of unstable relationships, distorted sense of self, and strong emotional reactions. It has ruined a few relationships, this part will probably make you think I'm an ass but I want you to remember that this is nothing I can control over. I could go to bed one night being totally in love then wake up feeling nothing. This is gonna sound really awful and I know it is. There were one such time were I woke up one morning and feeling nothing and decided to break up with my girlfriend shortly after she told me she had a  miscarriage. I neither felt or cared nothing about it. Same with the time my ex had an abortion. I cared as much at that as dropping a plate or two. EUPD have made it almost impossible for me to connect with others or care about others. I have lost girls I loved and friends that has been so important to me. That you become something close to a machine with no feelings nor a sense of what's right or wrong, losing in such a way is a bit scary, but what is worse is getting used to it. I now been single for about 13 years, and will probably be single for many more years to come.
    I have grown to accept that I will always need to take medication to be able to live and function as a person, and I can't sleep without taking medication for it.
    I still have moments of psychosis, mood swings and anxiety and I know that I always will have. I have accepted everything that comes with my diagnoses/disorders. But such is my live.
    You made it here. Maybe some of you can relate to what you just have read. Either that you felt it yourself or know someone like this. But What I realy want to say with all this is to tell you that you are not alone. Don't be afraid or ashamed over ir. Don't feel ashamed if you need a professional to talk to or that you need medication. Whatever it is you have always remembered to keep your head high and keep it close to your heart, wear it like a badge of honour.
    Take care everyone

  • Justin Guerrero

    Justin Guerrero

    4 күн мурун

    Who IS NOT on the fuckin spectrum no one's special,I've just always thought that no offense sorry 👊💔😭😩😩💀

    • Justin Guerrero

      Justin Guerrero

      Күн мурун

      More ppl needa read/see that^^^^^🤔🤔hmm

    • Justin Guerrero

      Justin Guerrero

      Күн мурун

      @fuck google wooow

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      In a way, yes. Copy pasting from another comment cuz lazy: "It depends on the person. I've described it like um...Imagine each person has a set of sliders (like a stereo equalizer), each of which being a different aspects of their life, such as executive function (ability to plan ahead), sensitivity to sights/sounds/touch/taste/smell/etc, comfort with eye contact, social skills, etc. Neurotypical people tend to have their sliders around the 'default', without at most MAYBE one of the sliders considerably higher or lower than the average range. Autistic people are those with multiple, if not all, of their sliders in extreme positions. I have fantastic semantic memory but my episodic memory is awful. I'm excellent at understanding systemic concepts, but have poor social skills. The photographic memory thing generally isn't real, and the closest real life condition to it isn't an aspect of autism." Nobody's special, but each of us have our strengths and weaknesses, and being aware of those can help us find where we fit in society.

    • Justin Guerrero

      Justin Guerrero

      3 күн мурун

      😭😭😭🤣🤣🤣😂💀

  • Justin Guerrero

    Justin Guerrero

    4 күн мурун

    The spectrum 😛

  • Dana Obera

    Dana Obera

    4 күн мурун

    Kyle, thank you for opening up with your condition. You have NO idea how much I needed to hear this today. My 2 years old son was diagnosed with ASD two years ago. I was (and still am) depressed over his condition mainly because I don't know a lot about what's he going through right now and if he can stand on his own two feet as an adult one day. But seeing how well you're doing (you're my nerdy science guy :)) it really reassured me my son is going to be OK. Thank you.

    • fuck google

      fuck google

      2 күн мурун

      There's been speculation that many of the world's greatest scientists over the millenia were autistic, such as Newton and Einstein. While it can't be conclusively proven for obvious reasons, being autistic isn't necessarily a bad thing. It just means that he will excel in some aspects and struggle in others. Even giving a crap means you care more than my parents ever did, and I'm getting along okay at 32 years old, have a degree in applied comp sci and a wife of 16 years. Yes, we were high school sweethearts. She's actually autistic too. c: Be patient and honest with him, be aware of sensory overload (it happens a lot for some of us and it's very stressful), and try to understand why he did something if he breaks a rule, and he'll do fine. Thank you for even caring.

  • Nora Michels

    Nora Michels

    4 күн мурун

    I found out I was autistic a few years ago when I was 22; it was a total surprise for me, but nobody else in my life was surprised lol.

  • OG_Skullkid 13

    OG_Skullkid 13

    5 күн мурун

    The 1.5k people who thumbs downed this are scumbags.

  • OspreyKnight

    OspreyKnight

    5 күн мурун

    Good, and thank you for talking about it. Its hard to communicate and express what it is like.
    I'm in the military as public affairs. I've deployed, I've been around the world. After everything I've experienced the scariest thing for me after 13 years is still asking someone for an interview, looking them in the eye(or bridge of the nose), learning how to display the right social ques to make people feel comfortable.
    The advice I have is to be brave. You're going to screw up socially, you're going to get lumps. Learn from it and drive on. Fear and anxiety are tools, not your master. Doesn't matter if you're jumping out of a perfectly good air plane, or talking to a senator. Close your eyes, take a breath, commit to the action, and take a step forward consequences be damned.

  • Kelly Baker

    Kelly Baker

    5 күн мурун

    I just had my friend share this video,that her son shared with her to express and share with his mom his journey... thanks for being vulnerable and speaking about your experience.. It impacts individuals, and families... So great for you to share so others do not feel alone. You are a super powerful man... what a blessing

  • nonewalker2009

    nonewalker2009

    5 күн мурун

    Thank you.

  • John Perivolaris

    John Perivolaris

    5 күн мурун